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November 28, 2020

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Perspectives

Pittsburgh Perspectives  

Archive List Link to PEQ
Thursday, March 26, 2020  08:05 AM  (32)

2019 Population Estimates for the Pittsburgh region

This morning the Census Bureau released the latest population estimates for counties and metropolitan areas across the nation. These new estimates reflect the population as of July 1, 2019.

The 2019 population of the seven-county Pittsburgh Metropolitan Statistical Area* (MSA) is estimated to have declined between 2018-2019 by 5,053 (or -0.2%) to 2,317,600. Among the 40 largest MSAs in the United States, Pittsburgh is one of six, including Cleveland, Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, New York and San Jose to have experienced a population decline between 2018 and 2019. The regions with the fastest rates of population increase over the year include Austin (+2.8%), Phoenix (+2.0%) and Las Vegas (+1.8%).

Estimated Rates of Population Change July 1, 2018-July 1, 2019

40 Largest Metropolitan Statistical Areas 

Population decline in the Pittsburgh region is primarily the result of ongoing natural population decline – which is the result of a greater number of deaths than births each year – along with population losses due to domestic migration. Domestic migration is the movement of population within the United States. The Pittsburgh MSA is estimated to have experienced 4,817 more deaths than births between 2018-2019. Domestic migration is estimated to have generated an additional population loss of 2,658 over the same period.

Some of these regional population losses are offset by international immigration, but the Pittsburgh region has one of the lowest rates of international immigration among large metropolitan regions in the nation. Net international migration is estimated to have generated a regional population gain of 2,555 between 2018-2019. Mirroring lower international immigration levels across the nation, this is the lowest rate of international immigration for the region over the last decade.  

Within the region, only Butler County was estimated to have experienced a small population gain of 215 (+0.1%) between 2018-2019.  Westmoreland County experienced the largest population decline, contracting by an estimated 1,560 people, or -0.4%.  Armstrong County experienced the largest percentage decline, contacting by 617 people, or -0.9%.  Allegheny County, the region’s largest county is estimated to have contracted by 1,236, or -0.1%.  All counties in the Pittsburgh MSA are experiencing natural population declines and only Butler County is estimated to be gaining population due to domestic migration. Allegheny County 

Demographic Components of Population Change, Pittsburgh MSA Counties, July 1, 2018 - July 1, 2019

County

2018 Estimate

2019 Estimate

Natural Population Change

Net International Immigration

Net Domestic Migration

Net Population Change*

Allegheny

1,217,281

1,216,045

-1,027

2,392

-2,543

-1,236

-0.1%

Armstrong

65,352

64,735

-238

0

-378

-617

-0.9%

Beaver

164,582

163,929

-565

9

-86

-653

-0.4%

Butler

187,638

187,853

-262

58

431

215

0.1%

Fayette

130,323

129,274

-576

7

-476

-1,049

-0.8%

Washington

207,018

206,865

-583

47

402

-153

-0.1%

Westmoreland

350,459

348,899

-1,566

42

-8

-1,560

-0.4%

 

Census Bureau population estimates are compiled based on multiple administrative and secondary sources. Natural population change is estimated from public record vital statistics which include the number of local birth and deaths. Domestic migration is estimated from a variety of sources including change of addresses recorded in Internal Revenue Service (IRS) tax filings and for Social Security recipients. The upcoming 2020 Decennial Census will be a complete enumeration of the nation’s population as of April 1, 2020 and can differ from these population estimates generated between decennial censuses. 

 

 

 




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