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Friday
September 17, 2021

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Graduate Certificate in Gerontology

Schedule of Courses - Spring Term
Fall Term  ·  Spring Term  ·  Summer Term

* = Online Course

This course is student-initiated educational experience, guided by a faculty member that significantly supplements the core curriculum of the certificate and provides specialized focus training in aging.
This course will provide the guidance and rationale for promoting health, prevention, and effective risk factor management in the adult population (50+) in respect to rising health care costs, decreasing benefits, and the aging of our population.  This course offers a general overview of various aging issues (physical, cognitive, social, cultural, and economic) that impact the individual, community, and society.  This course will prepare students to integrate optimal preventive practice into their professional context and translate evidence-based strategies into community outreach services that are designed to prevent or delay the common conditions of aging and ones that emphasize the importance of healthy behaviors throughout the life span.
This course will provide the student with an introduction to the aging process in our society.  It will examine the aging phenomena by focusing on; life span development, person-environment interaction, optimal quality of life, cross-cultural considerations, how aging is studied, and access to resources in a new age.
This course is designed for students to learn about the evolving role of caregiving in our society.  This course will examine the challenges and responsibilities associated with caring for an older adult in the home setting, and the supportive options and resources that are available.
This course provides a student with the opportunity to study independently, and in detail, some aspect of aging in which he or she has a particular interest.
Course provides an overview of the aging experience from a cross-cultural and a public health perspective.  The ways in which people cope with and adapt to the aging process is the major theme.
This course is an in-depth human behavior and social environment course focusing on development during the adult years (early and middle age) and on old age.  This course offers a framework for understanding adult life stages from a life-span developmental perspective.  This includes an examination of developmental tasks, dilemmas, and challenges influenced by a complex environment of cultural, economic, and political forces.
This course is designed to examine the dynamics and procedural steps in social policymaking and implementation first in a general context and then more specifically in relation to the older population.  The last half of the course is devoted to the identification of major issues in social policy for the aged and intensive analysis of selected policy decisions.
Methods of intervention with the suicidal and terminally ill patient and his family, covering ethical problems related to right to life and right to death issues, explication of Kubler-Ross' five stages of dying, religious orientations to death and dying, and pathological and normal grief reactions.
This course is designed to familiarize students with the basic terminology and models of pharmacokinetics and the role of social workers in medication management.  The development of psychopharmacology from a historical and sociological perspective as well as an overview of neurochemistry and biological-psychological functioning will be addressed.  Emphasis will be placed on the development of a range of techniques and strategies in collaboration with clients, families, and other providers in order for social workers to be responsive to the comprehensive needs of their clients.
This course focuses on diagnostic decision-making from the perspective of diagnostic reasoning and the relative validities of various functional (disability) assessment methodologies: self report, proxy-report, clinical judgment, performance testing.
This course focuses on the evidence supporting compensatory occupational therapy interventions, including task and environmental adaptations, job modifications, and assistive technology.
This course provides experiential learning in coordinating occupational therapy research, including obtaining IRB approval, getting informed consent, participating in data collection, and managing data quality.
The purpose of this course is to widen the student's understanding of human death, in its biological, socio-cultural, and primarily, psychological dimensions.  We will examine the concept of death, psychological reactions to death and dying, and the process of bereavement.  We will also explore selected issues such as suicide and euthanasia, children's concepts of death, and the question of life after death.  It is hoped that with increased knowledge about death and dying, you will be able to look more critically at materials being published in the popular press.
This course is designed to examine the dynamics and procedural steps in social policymaking and implementation first in a general context and then more specifically in relation to the older population.  The last half of the course is devoted to the identification of major issues in social policy for the aged and intensive analysis of selected policy decisions.
This course is an online, interactive experience based on the 13 year success of the generations Together Intergenerational training Institute at the University of Pittsburgh.  The course is designed to help develop skills needed for success in the intergenerational field.  Students read course materials, do online assignments, and discuss the content with fellow students and instructors.  And follow step-by- step procedures to complete the individual units.

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For more information contact:

Bissell

Jennifer K. Bissell

Program Coordinator
bissell@pitt.edu
(412) 624-1019

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University
Center for Social & Urban Research
3343 Forbes Ave
Pittsburgh, PA 15260

ucsur@pitt.edu
412-624-5442